Kids in the garden

“Spending time with children is a lot more important than spending money on children”.

In previous generations children generally grew up outside, playing in gardens, creeks and parks.

Unfortunately we are seeing it more and more these days where outside time for children is becoming limited as they spend more and more time watching TV, time on iPads and phones or playing video/computer games.

While these activities play a part in their development in today’s society, nothing can compare to the benefits (health, social and educational) of getting outside and playing, getting dirty, having adventures

and generally having fun being a kid in the great outdoors.

Getting your kids outside doesn’t necessarily mean you need to take them camping in the bush (although as a child my most favourite memories were camping with the family).

Even with our busy lives and limited time it’s so easy to start small and so important to spend time with and communicate with your children. Get them outside into your garden, even if you don’t have a big garden there are loads of options to help inspire their (and your) creativity.

A garden to inspire imagination //

Create a special fairy garden, with fairies and unicorns, mushrooms and pretty flowers to inspire your little girl’s imagination; A place of wishes and dreams.

Or you could create a race track through your garden for toy cars for the more adventurous and outgoing types. Build a cubby house under a weeping tree or create a special kid’s garden in an unused corner of your yard where kids can make mud pies, build scarecrows and be creative in their own space.

Vegetable gardens //

Vegetable gardens have many benefits for kids (and adults)! Not only will it help them to learn how things grow, or where their food comes from, but it is a great opportunity for parents to bond with their children over successes and help instil a level of responsibility and self confidence that they can indeed care and grow plants.

Keep it interesting with a few different and fun plants like sunflowers to help attract bees, or pumpkins that almost grow before their eyes.

I remember my mum telling me that my older brother never ate tomatoes as a little boy. In her vegie garden she had grown cherry tomatoes and one day caught him picking, eating and enjoying the sweet cherry tomatoes!

So, if it only does one thing, it might just help your child to eat their vegetables!

Gardens are a great bonding opportunity for you and your children. It’s never too early or too late to start their gardening journey. Have fun!

♦♦♦

Kristee Semmler of The Barossa Nursery

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